Elective Courses

SOC 100

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, theories, and methods in sociology. It explores the interactions between self and society by examining social structure, social consciousness, and social change. It takes the perspective that individuals both affect and are affected by values, norms, groups, and institutions.

1.00 c.u.
With a grade of C or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PSY 100

Introduction to psychological research methods, biological foundations, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, human development, personality, social behavior, psychological disorders and treatment, and applied psychology.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
GIS 100

The nature and use of political power. Political analysis of social institutions and behavior and their impact upon the distribution of social values. Current political problems.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
SCI 100

Integrated Science is an introductory course that deals with the fundamental behavior of matter and energy in living and nonliving sys- tems. It is intended to serve the needs of non- science majors who are required to complete science courses as part of the general educa- tion requirements. It introduces basic con- cepts and key ideas while providing opportu- nities for students to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about their environ- ment. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
FYS 100

The goal of the First-Year Seminar is to welcome the student to Bloomfield College by providing support in transition to college life; understanding the value of a liberal arts education; furthering the development of student career, college and life success skills; and building the expectation of academic and life success.

1.00 c.u.
CHM 100

This course, an introduction to the structure, properties, and behavior of materials, is intended for non-science majors. Principles of chemistry are illustrated through demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and applications to everyday life. Prior study of chemistry is not required.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
PHL 100

A survey of perennial issues and problems of philosophy addressed from historical or contemporary perspectives. Such problems may include: freedom and determinism, personal identity, the existence of God, right and wrong, reason and sensation, problems of knowledge, etc.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
CMP 100

Primarily through self-study and computer based training, students will develop essential skills in software for word processing, presentations, and spreadsheets. The bulk of the course will be devoted to preparing students to be able to leverage current, emerging, and future technologies. Topics include the application of computers to major career disciplines, the internet, Web 2.0, the impact of computers on society, and emerging and disruptive technologies.

1.00 c.u.
Technological & Digital Literacy
CAT 101

Come alive as a dancer, singer, actor or artist in a short course where you collaborate with others, try out a new art form, develop your talents, and learn a great deal about being creative and expressive. This is a rotating series of half-courses that fulfill the Aesthetic Appreciation requirement for General Education. May be repeated for credit.

0.50 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
NTW 101

The course explores how computers represent different types of data; numeric, text, image, and audio. Students learn about the difference between analog and digital signals, finite precision, Boolean logic and simplification of digital circuits using Boolean algebra. In addition, they learn how computers perform arithmetic using adders, and how bit storage is implemented using latches and flip-flops. At a higher level, students also learn how computer components interact to achieve computing; memory hierarchy, chipset and system clock, bus system architecture, storage device organization, and motherboard/CPU.

1.00 c.u.
Laboratory work is integrated within the class. Students possessing CompTIA A+ certification will be granted credit for NTW 101.
Technological & Digital Literacy
PHL 101

Contemporary moral issues in the light of traditional and contemporary philosophical analysis. Racial discrimination, violence, poverty and affluence, changing moral standards, the values of a business society, and the rights, responsibilities and problems of the individual with respect to his society

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
HON 101

This interdisciplinary seminar is for honors level freshmen who want to explore theories of multiple intelligences, diverse learning styles, the campus resources, and off-campus learning activities. Discussions and activities connect freshmen with professors, scholars and artists in and outside the classroom, on and off campus. Students reflect on their own work and talents and the goals for their education.

0.50 c.u.
HIS 102

This course will introduce students to the discipline of Public History including museum studies, oral history, and public commemoration, among other avenues for the preservation and dissemination of history to and for the public. Special attention will be paid to public debates over the commemoration of historical events.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
GIS 102

International Studies is an interdisciplinary field drawing from disciplines such as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. This first part of the course addresses questions regarding modernity and state sovereignty, along with the struggle of critical social theory to make sense of historical changes in the mode of capitalist societies–particularly modernization theories focus on development and its counter argument of underdevelopment. Other questions raised by critical theory concern relationships between time, space and capital/class formations and ideology, along with heightened concerns over how ideology figures in the reproductions of power relations and how science and technology contribute to emancipation or domination.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
WRT 102

This course is designed for students in need of extended instruction in college-level writing. It teaches writing as a process by requiring a number of written drafts per essay. The focus is on developing students’ college-level competence in analytic and argumentative, thesis-based writing. This class meets four times a week; twice in a traditional college setting, and twice in a computer lab/studio setting. Much of your written work will be done in the studio.

2.00 c.u.
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C- or better. Students who successfully pass this class take WRT 108 the next semester.
SCI 103

The introductory course in astronomy explains how physical laws prescribe natural processes in the universe. It includes discussions on the motion, composition and evolution of the planets, stars and interstellar matter and, examines the structure and evolution of the universe using the Big Bang theory. Some lab is an integral part of this course.

1.00 c.u.
Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.
Scientific Literacy
HIS 104
Also Known As: WMS 104

(Also WMS 104) This course surveys some of the major themes relevant to a gendered understanding of politics, society, and culture. The course introduces gender as a central category of analysis, among others, for critical inquiry, and it examines the experiences of women and men to offer a conceptualization of what gender means for individuals both as citizens and as community members.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
WMS 104
Also Known As: HIS 104

(Also HIS 104) Community Orientation & Citizenship This course surveys some of the major themes relevant to a gendered understanding of politics, society, and culture. The course introduces gender as a central category of analysis, among others, for critical inquiry, and it examines the experiences of women and men to offer a conceptualization of what gender means for individuals both as citizens and as community members.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
PHY 105

This is an algebra-based course covering some of the fundamental principles and laws of nature. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, fluids, kinetic theory of gases, heat and thermodynamics, periodic phenomena and wave motion. This course consists of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
Or consent of the Instructor.
Education Co-Concentration
CAT 105

This is a studio art course that focuses onmaking things from simple materials: papier-maché, wire, clay, wood, string, paper, cloth, cardboard and everyday objects that are often thrown away. It is the ultimate recycling, green course. So, you should bring in anything that you think can be used to make art.

1.00 c.u.
AFS 105
Also Known As: HIS 105

This course will offer a broad survey of African peoples and the African Diaspora in the world, beginning with their African origins. Special attention will be paid to the enslavement of Africans, colonization, and the resultant freedom struggles undertaken by Africans and the African Diaspora.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
NUR 105

Study of nutrition in relation to nutrients throughout the life cycle. Nursing assessment, planning and evaluation of diet, and food beliefs are explored.  

0.50 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , BIO 205 Human Anatomy And Physiology I
Undeclared-Nursing major students only and Prerequisite or Co-requisite.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , BIO 205 Human Anatomy And Physiology I
WRT 105

This course is designed for students in need of enhanced instruction in college-level writing. It teaches writing as a process by requiring a number of written drafts per essay. The focus is on developing students’ college-level competence in argumentative, thesis-based writing. Many classes are held in the computer lab to enable intensive writing instruction, and some out-of-class tutoring may be assigned.

1.50 c.u.
Students must receive a grade of C- or better to advance to WRT 109.
GIS 105
Also Known As: ECN 105

(Also ECN 105) In this course we study the American political and economic systems; we explore their interdependence and investigate the nature of their integration. Since the United States Constitution is the single common unifying legal force in the American Society, we study the structure of the Constitution first. Then, we focus on the commercial and economic provisions of the Constitution. Next, we investigate the relationship between economics and politics and finally we discuss the social philosophies of the main political groups that compete for political power in America today.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
HIS 105
Also Known As: AFS 105

(Also AFS 105) This course will offer a broad survey of African peoples and the African Diaspora in the world, beginning with their African origins. Special attendtion will be paid to the elslavement of Africans, colonization and the resultant freedom struggles undertaken by Africans and the African Diaspora.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness

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