Natural Science & Mathematics Courses

CHM 100

This course, an introduction to the structure, properties, and behavior of materials, is intended for non-science majors. Principles of chemistry are illustrated through demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and applications to everyday life. Prior study of chemistry is not required.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
MTH 106

A course designed to develop an understanding of the mathematical concepts supporting topics taught at the elementary level. Central to these is the number sense required to teach basic operations (addition, subtraction,multiplication and division) with non-negative integers. Fractions, decimals, mental calculation and estimation are also considered. Students will use visualization, diagrams,manipulatives, and engaging in mathematical conversation to explore alternative ways of understanding and communicating required concepts. This course does not satisfy the mathematics requirement of the General Education Core.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: EDC 330 Introduction to Curriculum Design I: Research-Based Practice
BIO 111

This course is one of two introductory general biology courses. Topics include the origin of life, the cellular level of organization, the chemical/physical basis of life, genetics, and the molecular biology of gene expression.

1.00 c.u.
Education Co-Concentration
CHM 111

This is a comprehensive introduction to the principles of chemistry. The course is intended primarily for students who are majoring in the natural sciences or enrolled in science-based pre-professional programs. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, patterns of reactivity, gas laws, thermochemistry, and quantum theory. The course consists of lecture, recitation, and one three-hour laboratory per week.

1.00 c.u.
One year of high school Chemistry.
Corequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
Education Co-Concentration
CHM 112

This course is a continuation of CHM 111. Topics covered include theories of covalent bonding, the liquid and solid states, physical properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemistry. The course consists of lecture, recitation, and one three-hour laboratory per week.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: CHM 111 General Chemistry I , MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
Education Co-Concentration
BIO 115

This course presents selected topics in biology. Topics may include evolution, biomechanics (e.g. flight), emerg ing diseases (e.g. AIDS, Ebola virus), history of biological science, antibiotic resistant pathogens, cancer, nutrition, biotechnology and human affairs, etc. As topics change, this course may be repeated for credit.    Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
CHM 120

This course covers selected principles of inorganic, organic and biochemistry in application to living systems. The course includes lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory per week. This course cannot be used to help fulfill the chemistry requirement for science majors.   

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 140 College Algebra: Enhanced , MTH 141 College Algebra
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
BIO 121

This course is one of two introductory general biology courses. Topics will include the evolution, diversity, development, reproduction, physiology, ecology, and behavior of living organisms. Laboratory work will include naturalistic observation as well as experimentation and will emphasize the analysis, organization, and presentation of data.

1.00 c.u.
Education Co-Concentration
MTH 130

A course designed to develop a transition from high school expectations to the study of mathematics at the collegiate level made easier through the use of the TI-84+ graping calculator as an aid to understanding of mathematical concepts. Critical thinking will be a central theme woven through the concepts of number sense; using percents to show change and comparison; solving simple equations through the application of interest, discount, and sales price; and introductory algebra including applications of linear and quadratic functions. This course will be waived if the student’s mathematical preparation is sufficient. Students who have received credit for a higher level mathematics may not take this course.

1.00 c.u.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 140

This is an enriched college algebra course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 141

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 160

This is an enriched pre-calculus course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ calculator. Polynormal, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition MTH 160 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 161

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of T1-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition, MTH 161 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 200

This course covers the methodology of organizing, summarizing, and presenting statistical data. Students calculate and interpret the measures of central tendency and dispersion and are introduced to probability and distribution theory (Normal, Binomial, Poisson). They use distribution and sampling theory to make statistical inferences.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 140 College Algebra: Enhanced , MTH 141 College Algebra , MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
BIO 200

This course describes the structure, physiology and culture of bacteria and related organisms, their importance in nature and their relationship to human problems of food preservation, sanitation, disease, and immunity.

1.00 c.u.
Education Co-Concentration
BIO 205

This course is a study of the organization of the human body, and the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, and circulatory (heart and circulation) systems. It is the first part of a two part sequence. The laboratory experience will include study of mammalian anatomy.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisite: High School Biology
Education Co-Concentration
BIO 206

This course is a study of the structure and physiology of the human circulatory (hematology), respiratory, nervous, “special senses”, digestive, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, and integumentary systems. General information on cells and tissues will be presented. It is the second part of a two part sequence. The laboratory experience will include experiments in physiology.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: BIO 205 Human Anatomy And Physiology I , BIO 121 General Biology: Diversity
Education Co-Concentration
BIO 209

This is an introductory course focusing on man's environment. The organism, population, community, ecosystem, and biosphere levels of organization will be studied with respect to the interrelationships occurring in the natural world. Aspects of air, water, solid waste, and noise pollution, population problems, our energy dilemma, use of pesticides, and the state of our natural resources will also be discussed. This course is designed for nonscience majors. Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

1.00 c.u.
CHM 211

The course covers the theoretical and experimental principles of chemical analysis and ionic equilibria. Gravimetric, volumetric, electrometric, and instrumental methods are covered from the quantitative point of view. The course consists of lecture and recitation.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: CHM 112 General Chemistry II
BIO 211

This course is a study of the life history of man from birth to death including a discussion of all major organ systems and how they function to maintain the organism in the environment. It will include the biology of sex and heredity of man. This course is designed primarily for majors other than biology, and will not count toward the biology major. Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
CHM 212

This four hour laboratory is associated with CHM 211. The course emphasizes wet chemistry techniques which include gravimetric and volumetric methods of analysis. Separation methods such as chromatography are also discussed along with some spectroscopy. Instrumental techniques of IR, UV-VIS, HPLC and Atomic Absorption may also be explored.

0.50 c.u.
Prerequisites: CHM 112 General Chemistry II
Corequisites: CHM 211 Chemical Analysis and Instrumentation
BIO 213

This course is an in-depth treatment of nucleic acid metabolism and cellular architecture. The lecture emphasizes the relationships between structure and function at the cellular level, while the laboratory component highlights recent developments in recombinant DNA technology.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: BIO 111 General Biology: Cell , BIO 200 Microbiology
MTH 221

Basic theory of differential calculus through the concepts of limits and continuity are the goals of this course. Necessary analytic geometry is developed as required. Algebraic and trigonometric functions, curve sketching and applications to real world problems (including maximum/minimum problems). The Mean Value Theorem, and its consequences are covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
With a grade of C or higher
Education Co-Concentration
MTH 222

This is an introduction to the integral calculus and its application to the solution of real world problems. Integration of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, and an introduction to differential equations are covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
Education Co-Concentration
MTH 223

The study of calculus is continued through sequences and series, multivariable functions and their derivatives, multiple integrals and vector valued functions, Green’s Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem. Applications using the graphing calculator are included.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II

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