General Education Courses

General Education: Aesthetic Appreciation Courses

CAT 101

Come alive as a dancer, singer, actor or artist in a short course where you collaborate with others, try out a new art form, develop your talents, and learn a great deal about being creative and expressive. This is a rotating series of half-courses that fulfill the Aesthetic Appreciation requirement for General Education. May be repeated for credit.

0.50 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 124

A participatory class offering an introduction to beginning jazz, hip-hop and theater dance technique. The technique focuses on yoga breathing through movement as fundamentals of ballet, jazz and modern elements are combined in class to reflect dance styles ranging from the street to the Broadway stage. The art of dance develops self-confidence in a fun, supportive environment.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
ENG 150

An introduction to various literacy genres: poetry, drama and fiction. Specific syllabus at the discretion of the instructor. Emphasis on the literature of western Europe and the United States. Focus on literature and its relation to society

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
CAT 189

Introduces students to basic choral participation which will enable them to: find their singing voice; match pitches in specific ranges and learn to follow a score of written music. The repertoire will include music from all periods from European classical to contemporary American popular styles.

0.50 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 190

This course offers a semester-long project in one particular form of movement theatre, ranging from ballet to modern dance to stage combat to mime to physical comedy. All projects involve full participation of mind, body, and spirit and culminate in a small public performance. This course may be repeated once for credit.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 191

Group instruction offered in the electronic piano lab for students who have had no previous piano training. The emphasis will be on playing simple pieces, reading, basic keyboard harmony and elementary keyboard technique.

0.50 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 192

A continuation of CAT 191.

0.50 c.u.
Prerequisites: CAT 191 Beginning Piano I
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 193

A hands-on practical introduction to basic techniques and concepts of acting. Theater games, movement exercises, and character improvisations serve as a foundation for later work on scripted scenes. Attendance, participation, and energy are essential, as most of the work and grade are based on what happens in the class.

0.50 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
ENG 203

Selected works in English literature with emphasis on historical, cultural, and aesthetic values, including material from Beowulf to Boswell. Lecture and discussion

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Education Co-Concentration, Writing Intensive
ENG 204

Selected works in English literature with emphasis on historical, cultural, and aesthetic values, including material from the romantic period to the Second World War. Lecture, discussion.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Education Co-Concentration, Writing Intensive
CAT 207

To appreciate art, it helps to know it firsthand by making art yourself: some sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, and new experimental forms. It also helps to hear what artists have to say about their work, to know some art history, and to leave a course knowing whose work you enjoy and why. This course provides you with this kind of first-hand experience.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 211

Paris as the bustling artistic and cultural nexus and the birthplace of Modernism. A study of the art and culture of France from 1870 to 1945, with focus on artists who changed our way of seeing: Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir, Cezanne, Morisot, Cassatt, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Rodin, Claudel, Vuillard, Bonnard, Braque, Matisse, and Picasso.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 213

Focus on the musical ensemble skills associated with improvisation. Course will be participatory, and the bulk of the time in class will be spent playing music. Diverse cultural approaches to improvisation –African-American, South Indian, and European –will be explored. This course may be repeated for credit for a total of 3 semesters.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
COM 213

(Formerly JOU 213) Oral interpretation is defined as the study of literature through performance. The course is designed to train students to use their bodies and voices to interpret poetry, drama and prose, children’s literature, world literature and documentary material. Students will present literature in individual and ensemble performances.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Minimum grade C- or higher
Aesthetic Appreciation, Education Co-Concentration
CAT 214

Important works of Latin American painting and sculpture from 1900-1950, emphasizing stylistic analysis and the relationship of the art to its socio-cultural context.  

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 218

Studio work in composition and color in acrylic or oils.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 222

The course includes at least a week of intensive group travel and study abroad. Our goal is to increase your appreciation of art history, to develop your communication with the enjoyment of people in another country, and to make you an experienced traveler. The best way to understand works of art and architecture is to see the originals in their country of origin. This course prepares you to study art history abroad by familiarizing you in advance in class with art in its cultural context. Students have found this course to be a life-changing experience.  

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation
ENG 223
Also Known As: WMS 223

(Also WMS 223) This course focuses on literature in English written by women. We study themes and techniques common to the literature by women. From the late Middle Ages until the present, we examine texts that challenge beliefs about female inferiority, promote a women’s perspective on gender and allow for a discussion of self-esteem, motherhood, privacy and women’s power.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
WMS 223

(Also ENG 223) This course focuses on literature in English written by women. We study themes and techniques common to the literature by women. From the late Middle Ages until the present, we examine texts that challenge beliefs of female inferiority, promote a women's perspective on gender and allow for discussion of self esteem, motherhood, privacy, and women's power.                     

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 227
Also Known As: REL 227

(Also REL 227) Selected poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction that explore such topics as faith, the nature and presence of God, death and immortality, spirituality, sin, and salvation. The course invites students to examine and reflect on the interrelationship of literary expression and a theological understanding of the world.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
REL 227

Selected poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction that explore such topics as faith, the nature and presence of God, death and immortality, spirituality, sin, and salvation. The course invites student to examine and reflect on the interrelationship of literary expression and a theological understanding of the world.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
CAT 230

This class will explore the history and development of animation throughout the 20th century. Major social and technological movements and the effects they had on animators working at the time will be analyzed and discussed. This work will be examined to see how animation has developed as an art form. The class will read related texts and view historic and contemporary animation work.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 251

A study of the entire genre of fiction, including some novels. Emphasis will be placed on fiction of the 19th and 20th centuries.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 252

Selected plays representing the major periods of the drama from the Greeks to the present, with attention to the religious, social, and theatrical forces that shaped these works. Lecture and discussion.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 253

A study of the genre of poetry with emphasis on formal innovations and evolution of the art form. Focus will vary according to instructor’s discretion.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation

General Education: Civic Engagement Courses

HIS 102

This course will introduce students to the discipline of Public History including museum studies, oral history, and public commemoration, among other avenues for the preservation and dissemination of history to and for the public. Special attention will be paid to public debates over the commemoration of historical events.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
HIS 104
Also Known As: WMS 104

(Also WMS 104) This course surveys some of the major themes relevant to a gendered understanding of politics, society, and culture. The course introduces gender as a central category of analysis, among others, for critical inquiry, and it examines the experiences of women and men to offer a conceptualization of what gender means for individuals both as citizens and as community members.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
WMS 104
Also Known As: HIS 104

(Also HIS 104) Community Orientation & Citizenship This course surveys some of the major themes relevant to a gendered understanding of politics, society, and culture. The course introduces gender as a central category of analysis, among others, for critical inquiry, and it examines the experiences of women and men to offer a conceptualization of what gender means for individuals both as citizens and as community members.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
GIS 200

Analysis of national government and politics. The branches of government, political parties and pressure groups, voting behavior and the distribution of power in the American political system. Particular attention to contemporary problems and issues.

1.00 c.u.
Civic Engagement
EDC 202

This course introduces the teaching profession by panoramically exploring both general education and special education settings. It includes the study of American schools and considers diversity, multiculturalism, equity, and inclusive educational practices for students with and without disabilities.

1.00 c.u.
A field component in general education and special education classroom is required. This course is designed for undergraduates only. Students cannot take EDC 202 and EDC 217 simultaneously.
Civic Engagement
EDC 217

Community Orientation & Citizenship This course is designed to foster understanding of the significant roles of families and communities in the growth and education of children. Topics include recognizing children at-risk; recognizing and accepting diverse family units; the impact of home, community, health, and cultural experience on development and learning and understanding social, historical, political, legal and philosophical constructs that impact children, families and communities. Identification and collaboration with community agencies and resources to support individuals with special needs and their families will be addressed. Students cannot take EDC 202 and EDC 217 simultaneously.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Civic Engagement

General Education: Communication Skills Courses

SPA 110
Also Known As: LAC 110

(Also LAC 110) Introductory course to Spanish Language and Culture. Basic language skills for the student who has no previous knowledge of the language. Course will cover different language functions, basic vocabulary, simple grammatical structure, oral recitation and written composition. In addition to language studies, the course will compare and contrast American, Latin American, Latino and Spanish cultures.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
LAC 110
Also Known As: SPA 110

(Also SPA 110) Introductory course to Spanish Language and Culture. Basic language skills for the student who has no previous knowledge of the language. Course will cover different language functions, basic vocabulary, simple grammatical structure, oral recitation and written composition. In addition to language studies, the course will compare and contrast American, Latin American, Latino and Spanish cultures.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
FRN 115
Also Known As: LAC 115

(Also LAC 115) Introductory course to French Language and Culture. Basic language skills for the student who has no previous knowledge of the language. Course will cover different language functions, basic vocabulary, simple grammatical structures, oral recitation and written composition. In addition to language studies, the course will compare French and French diasporic cultures in the Caribbean, Africa and elsewhere.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
LAC 115
Also Known As: FRN 115

(Also FRN 115) Introductory course to French Language and Culture. Basic language skills for the student who has no previous knowledge of the language. Course will cover different language function, basic vocabulary, simple grammatical structures, oral recitation and written composition. In addition to language studies, the course will compare French and French diasporic cultures in the Caribbean, Africa and elsewhere.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
CRW 120

Introduction to the craft of writing. Frequent in-class and home assignments to explore various writing techniques and hone developing skills. This course culminates in a final portfolio of completed fiction, poetry and short drama. Designed primarily for freshmen

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
SPA 120
Also Known As: LAC 120

(Also LAC 120) Further development of language skills to broaden awareness and increase appreciation of the culture.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: SPA 110 Spanish Language And Culture I
Or two years of high school Spanish or consent of the Instructor.
Communication Skills
LAC 120
Also Known As: SPA 120

(Also SPA 120) Further development of language skills to broaden awareness and increase appreciation of the culture

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: LAC 110 Spanish Language and Culture I
Or two years of high school Spanish or consent of the Instructor.
Communication Skills
COM 122

(Formerly JOU 122) This course focuses on the theory and skills of preparing and presenting public speeches. The emphasis in this course is on practice and evaluation of classroom presentations and professional speeches.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
LAC 125
Also Known As: FRN 125

(Also FRN 125) Further development of language skills to broaden awareness and increase appreciation of the culture.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: FRN 115 French Language and Culture I
Or two years of high school French or consent of the Instructor.
Communication Skills
COM 128

(Formerly JOU 128) The nature and effect of contemporary mass media; history of the mass media; regulations regarding present and future uses; economic restraints and social control.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
ENG 150

An introduction to various literacy genres: poetry, drama and fiction. Specific syllabus at the discretion of the instructor. Emphasis on the literature of western Europe and the United States. Focus on literature and its relation to society

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
SPA 205

(Also LAC 205) Fundamentals of Spanish usage, oral and written. An introduction to Spanish diction and phonetics. The student acquires fluency in the reading of selections from the literary works as well as from training in correct pronunciation.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: SPA 120 Spanish Language And Culture II
Prerequisite: SPA 120 or consent of the Instructor
Communication Skills
WRT 205

In this class, you will learn and practice genres for professional and technical writing. You will extend your knowledge of planning, revising, and editing text and adjusting rhetorical strategies for different audiences from first-year writing. We will emphasize collaborative writing, technical skills for designing documents, editing for clarity and consistency, and exhibiting a professional ethos in writing, information design, and online communications.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: General Education: Writing Course
Prerequisite: WRT 108/109
Writing Intensive
Communication Skills
WRT 229
Also Known As: PHL 229

(Also PHL 226) This course surveys the highlights of the Western rhetorical tradition and what they can teach us about how we communicate in contemporary society. Generally speaking, rhetoricians study verbal and nonverbal language and communication. Certainly, language affects everything we do: how we think, learn, identify ourselves, and interact with others. According to American rhetorician Kenneth Burke (18971993), language “reflects, deflects, and selects” reality. In this course, we will look carefully at how this occurs and how the Western rhetorical tradition has influenced our current knowledge of what language does. Rhetoric is perhaps one of the oldest disciplines. What we know of its history has been shaped by Western rhetoricians over the ages-from the ancient Greeks, (Isocrates, Plato and Aristotle), to the Romans, (Quintilian and Cicero), through Medieval Times, (St Augustine) to the Renaissance (Petrus Ramus and Erasmus) and Enlightenment (Sir Francis Bacon and John Locke), and beyond to the 20th and 21st Centuries. This tradition constitutes a Western historical narrative that has shaped what we think rhetoric is and what it does, and is by no means Gospel. Other rhetorics are interrupting this dominant narrative about what the rhetorical tradition is. The field of rhetoric is much too broad to survey, even superficially, in one semester. Consequently, the lens (or to borrow a term from Burke, the terministic screen) we will use to examine the field will focus on the theories of those rhetoricians who have been most influential in a Western tradition.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Communication Skills
PHL 229
Also Known As: WRT 229

(Also WRT 229) This course surveys the highlights of the Western rhetorical tradition and what they can teach us about how we communicate in contemporary society. Generally speaking, rhetoricians study verbal and nonverbal language and communication. Certainly, language affects everything we do: how we think, learn, identify ourselves, and interact with others. According to American rhetorician Kenneth Burke (18971993), language “reflects, deflects, and selects” reality. In this course, we will look carefully at how this occurs and how the Western rhetorical tradition has influenced our current knowledge of what language does. Rhetoric is perhaps one of the oldest disciplines. What we know of its history has been shaped by Western rhetoricians over the ages-from the ancient Greeks, (Isocrates, Plato and Aristotle), to the Romans, (Quintilian and Cicero), through Medieval Times, (St Augustine) to the Renaissance (Petrus Ramus and Erasmus) and Enlightenment (Sir Francis Bacon and John Locke), and beyond to the 20th and 21st Centuries. This tradition constitutes a Western historical narrative that has shaped what we think rhetoric is and what it does, and is by no means Gospel. Other rhetorics are interrupting this dominant narrative about what the rhetorical tradition is. The field of rhetoric is much too broad to survey, even superficially, in one semester. Consequently, the lens (or to borrow a term from Burke, the terministic screen) we will use to examine the field will focus on the theories of those rhetoricians who have been most influential in a Western tradition.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Communication Skills
CAT 244

Understanding the ways in which visual ideas function and what they represent in our media landscape of advertising, news and popular culture requires important navigational tools and critical thinking skills. This class will explore a range of concepts and theories used to acquire analytical approaches towards the achievement of visual literacy.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Communication Skills
ENG 249

This course is designed as an intensive study in English grammar, punctuation, and usage. After reviewing the intricacies of English grammar, students will be required to apply their knowledge by revising and editing their own written work.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
CAT 256
Also Known As: WRT 256

(Also WRT 256) Writing in 21st century workplaces does not only involve typing emails and documents. In this class you will learn to compose in a variety of digital platforms by drawing upon both technical and rhetorical skills that you will develop over the course of the semester. You will deploy design processes with purpose, audience input, and revision in mind, building on your previous writing courses while composing for real audiences.

1.00 c.u.
Communication Skills
WRT 256
Also Known As: CAT 256

(Also CAT 256) Writing in 21st century workplaces does not only involve typing emails and documents. In this class you will learn to compose in a variety of digital platforms by drawing upon both technical and rhetorical skills that you will develop over the course of the semester. You will deploy design processes with purpose, audience input, and revision in mind, building on your previous writing courses while composing for real audiences.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: General Education: Writing Course
Prerequisite: WRT 108/109
Writing Intensive
Communication Skills
ENG 267
Also Known As: HIS 267

(Also HIS 267) This course will examine the evolution of the English language by reading texts (e.g. Beowulf, Chaucer, the King James Bible) to trace the development of the language from Old to Modern English. In order to explore the debates about language in modern America, we will also examine the evolution of the controversies surrounding African-American English.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Communication Skills
HIS 267
Also Known As: ENG 267

(Also ENG 267) This course will examine the evolution of the English language by reading texts (e.g. Beowulf, Chaucer, the King James Bible) to trace the development of the language from Old to Modern English. In order to explore the debates about language in modern America, we will also examine the evolution of the controversies surrounding African-American English.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Communication Skills

General Education: Information Literacy Courses

General Education: Math Courses

MTH 130

A course designed to develop a transition from high school expectations to the study of mathematics at the collegiate level made easier through the use of the TI-84+ graping calculator as an aid to understanding of mathematical concepts. Critical thinking will be a central theme woven through the concepts of number sense; using percents to show change and comparison; solving simple equations through the application of interest, discount, and sales price; and introductory algebra including applications of linear and quadratic functions. This course will be waived if the student’s mathematical preparation is sufficient. Students who have received credit for a higher level mathematics may not take this course.

1.00 c.u.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 140

This is an enriched college algebra course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 141

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 160

This is an enriched pre-calculus course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ calculator. Polynormal, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition MTH 160 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 161

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of T1-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition, MTH 161 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math

General Education: Problem Solving/Critical Thinking Courses

GIS 100

The nature and use of political power. Political analysis of social institutions and behavior and their impact upon the distribution of social values. Current political problems.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PHL 100

A survey of perennial issues and problems of philosophy addressed from historical or contemporary perspectives. Such problems may include: freedom and determinism, personal identity, the existence of God, right and wrong, reason and sensation, problems of knowledge, etc.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
SOC 100

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, theories, and methods in sociology. It explores the interactions between self and society by examining social structure, social consciousness, and social change. It takes the perspective that individuals both affect and are affected by values, norms, groups, and institutions.

1.00 c.u.
With a grade of C or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PSY 100

Introduction to psychological research methods, biological foundations, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, human development, personality, social behavior, psychological disorders and treatment, and applied psychology.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PHL 101

Contemporary moral issues in the light of traditional and contemporary philosophical analysis. Racial discrimination, violence, poverty and affluence, changing moral standards, the values of a business society, and the rights, responsibilities and problems of the individual with respect to his society

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
BUS 107

This course helps individuals understand personal financial planning. Specifically, the content of this course is geared to teach students how to prepare personal budgets and how to evaluate insurance requirements. The fundamentals of investment decisions will also be covered. Any student who has taken or is taking BUS 312 cannot take BUS 107 for credit.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PHL 110

Effective Reasoning is a general introduction to the principles of reasoning and logical analysis. The main focus of this course will be on the nature of arguments, the critical evaluation of arguments, and the evaluation of theories.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
EDC 120

This interdisciplinary methodology course will introduce students to the use of educational robotics as an alternative means of fostering learning in children. The main focus of the course will be a hands-on experience through which students will learn concepts of mathematics and science while working with the LEGO MINDSTORMS Robotics Intervention System and RoboLab programming software. This course is a strongly recommended Arts-as-Catalyst course for Education majors. Other students may register as well.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Technological & Digital Literacy
CMP 126

An introduction to the problem solving process, numerical methods, algorithms and algorithm design . Basic principles of software engineering, program design, coding, debugging, and documentation are introduced . Structured and object-oriented programming is taught using the Java platform.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PHL 200

The principles of reasoning, both deductive and inductive, immediate inference, the syllogism, fallacies, doctrine of probability and experimental method. The course acquaints the student with the conditions of valid thought and scientific inquiry.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
GIS 204

Concepts and questions that are the basis of Western political thought. Conflicting notions of justice, the nature and role of authority, individualistic and majoritarian principles in modern political life. Emphasis on the role of these principles in resolving issues of contemporary significance.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
GIS 205

Modern political thought with emphasis on political movements of this century: conservatism, liberalism, socialism, statism and radicalism. The role of political ideologies in modern political systems. The examination of competing ideologies in the light of contemporary issues.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
EDC 210
Also Known As: PSY 210

(Also PSY 210) The role of psychological concepts in educational practices, focusing on the nature and sources of intellectual development and readiness according to Piagetian, psychometric, and information process perspectives. Beyond these approaches to cognitive development, learning theory, motivation, and the role of emotion in learning will be discussed. This course will also include a section on individual differences in learning; exceptional students and social, ethnic, cultural, and gender differences. The related topics of measurement and evaluation of learning will round out the course.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PSY 210
Also Known As: EDC 210

(Also EDC 210) The role of psychological concepts in educational practices, focusing on the nature and sources of intellectual development and readiness according to Piagetian, psychometric, and information process perspectives. Beyond these approaches to cognitive development, learning theory, motivation, and the role of emotion in learning will be discussed. This course will also include a section on individual differences in learning; exceptional students and social, ethnic, cultural, and gender differences. The related topics of measurement and evaluation of learning will round out the course.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
LAC 216
Also Known As: HIS 216

(Also HIS 216) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean from Conquest to Independence. Special attention will be paid to encounters between various peoples; the economic, political, and cultural institutions of the colonial period; and the wars for independence that ended colonialism. This is the first course offered in the Latin American-Caribbean survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
HIS 216
Also Known As: LAC 216

(Also LAC 216) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean from Conquest to Independence. Special attention will be paid to encounters between various peoples; the economic, political, and cultural institutions of the colonial period; and the wars for independence that ended colonialism. This is the first course offered in the Latin American-Caribbean survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
HIS 219

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of writing history. Students will learn to both identify and make historical arguments, use primary and secondary sources to appropriately support an argument and successfully sustain an argument throughout academic papers of varying lengths. Students will develop their writing by editing and revising multiple drafts of papers.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
LAC 224
Also Known As: GIS 224

(Also GIS 224) American foreign policy today. American relations with major allies, the Communist countries and the Third World. Current problems in American foreign policy such as d’etente, national security, disarmament, the global allocation of resources.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
GIS 224
Also Known As: LAC 224

(Also LAC 224) American foreign policy today. American relations with major allies, the Communist countries and the Third World. Current problems in American foreign policy such as detente, national security, disarmament, the global allocation of resources.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
AFS 225
Also Known As: HIS 225

(Also HIS 225) This course explores the African American struggle for freedom after Reconstruction. Of particular concern will be the economic, political, social and cultural struggles that African-Americans waged to secure freedom and justice in the face of racial segregation and injustice. This is the second course in the African-American survey

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
HIS 225
Also Known As: AFS 225

(Also AFS 225) This course explores the African American struggle for freedom after Reconstruction. Of articular concern will be the economic, political, social and cultural struggles that African- Americans waged to secure freedom and justice in the face of racial segregation and injustice. This is the second course in the African- American survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
CMP 226

A continuation of CMP 126. Continued development of design, coding, debugging, and documentation. Topics covered include Servlet, Java Server Pages, Web Application, polymorphism, overloading along with the most common aspects of Java.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: CMP 126 Programming I
With a grade of C or higher.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
HIS 226
Also Known As: LAC 226

(Also LAC 226) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean since Independence. It will pay particular attention to the colonial legacy; the abolition of slavery; economic development; twentieth-century social movements and revolutions; and relations with the United States. This is the second course offered in the Latin American- Caribbean survey. 

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PHL 226

Philosophical reflection upon African-American social experience, African-American intellectual history, modern and contemporary oppositional discourse. Caribbean presence, Pan-Africanism, African heritage, value systems, aesthetics, political theology.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
LAC 226
Also Known As: HIS 226

(Also HIS 226) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean since Independence. It will pay particular attention to the colonial legacy; the abolition of slavery; economic development; twentieth-century social movements and revolutions; and relations with the United States. This is the second course offered in the Latin American-Caribbean survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking

General Education: Professionalism & Career Development Literacy Courses

General Education: Scientific Literacy Courses

SCI 100

Integrated Science is an introductory course that deals with the fundamental behavior of matter and energy in living and nonliving sys- tems. It is intended to serve the needs of non- science majors who are required to complete science courses as part of the general educa- tion requirements. It introduces basic con- cepts and key ideas while providing opportu- nities for students to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about their environ- ment. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
CHM 100

This course, an introduction to the structure, properties, and behavior of materials, is intended for non-science majors. Principles of chemistry are illustrated through demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and applications to everyday life. Prior study of chemistry is not required.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
SCI 103

The introductory course in astronomy explains how physical laws prescribe natural processes in the universe. It includes discussions on the motion, composition and evolution of the planets, stars and interstellar matter and, examines the structure and evolution of the universe using the Big Bang theory. Some lab is an integral part of this course.

1.00 c.u.
Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.
Scientific Literacy
BIO 115

This course presents selected topics in biology. Topics may include evolution, biomechanics (e.g. flight), emerg ing diseases (e.g. AIDS, Ebola virus), history of biological science, antibiotic resistant pathogens, cancer, nutrition, biotechnology and human affairs, etc. As topics change, this course may be repeated for credit.    Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
BIO 211

This course is a study of the life history of man from birth to death including a discussion of all major organ systems and how they function to maintain the organism in the environment. It will include the biology of sex and heredity of man. This course is designed primarily for majors other than biology, and will not count toward the biology major. Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy

General Education: Technological & Digital Literacy Courses

CMP 100

Primarily through self-study and computer based training, students will develop essential skills in software for word processing, presentations, and spreadsheets. The bulk of the course will be devoted to preparing students to be able to leverage current, emerging, and future technologies. Topics include the application of computers to major career disciplines, the internet, Web 2.0, the impact of computers on society, and emerging and disruptive technologies.

1.00 c.u.
Technological & Digital Literacy
NTW 101

The course explores how computers represent different types of data; numeric, text, image, and audio. Students learn about the difference between analog and digital signals, finite precision, Boolean logic and simplification of digital circuits using Boolean algebra. In addition, they learn how computers perform arithmetic using adders, and how bit storage is implemented using latches and flip-flops. At a higher level, students also learn how computer components interact to achieve computing; memory hierarchy, chipset and system clock, bus system architecture, storage device organization, and motherboard/CPU.

1.00 c.u.
Laboratory work is integrated within the class. Students possessing CompTIA A+ certification will be granted credit for NTW 101.
Technological & Digital Literacy
CMP 108

Students will develop the essential spreadsheet skills to solve business problems. Students will learn
how to create and format a workbook and work with formulas, functions, charts, and graphics.
Students will also learn to use PivotTables and PivotCharts, advanced formulas and functions, how
to manage multiple worksheets, and other advanced techniques. Students cannot receive credit for both CMP 100 and CMP 108.

1.00 c.u.
Technological & Digital Literacy
NTW 115

This course provides an introduction to features and functions of networking components. It provides the knowledge and skills needed to configure and troubleshoot basic networking hardware, protocol, and services. Laboratory work is integrated within the class.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: NTW 101 Data Representation and Digital Logic
Technological & Digital Literacy
EDC 120

This interdisciplinary methodology course will introduce students to the use of educational robotics as an alternative means of fostering learning in children. The main focus of the course will be a hands-on experience through which students will learn concepts of mathematics and science while working with the LEGO MINDSTORMS Robotics Intervention System and RoboLab programming software. This course is a strongly recommended Arts-as-Catalyst course for Education majors. Other students may register as well.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Technological & Digital Literacy
CMP 120

This course provides an overview of the various forms of cyber crime and the methods, thought process and tools used by criminals. Criminology theories such as conflict, control and strain will also be discussed. The impact of cyber crime and public policy implications will also be explored.

1.00 c.u.
Technological & Digital Literacy
CAT 364

This course is a practical approach to learning Motion Capture and the fundamentals of MotionBuilder. Students will learn how to work with the motion capture data on a professional level with an emphasis on navigating the interface, importing and applying motion capture data to a virtual actor and virtual character. Concepts of character retargeting, filters, f-curves, plotting 3D data, constraints, cameras, rendering, lights, materials, and shades will also be addressed.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: CAT 361 3D Modeling
Or permission of the Animation Coordinator.
Technological & Digital Literacy

General Education: Transcultural & Global Awareness Courses

GIS 102

International Studies is an interdisciplinary field drawing from disciplines such as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. This first part of the course addresses questions regarding modernity and state sovereignty, along with the struggle of critical social theory to make sense of historical changes in the mode of capitalist societies–particularly modernization theories focus on development and its counter argument of underdevelopment. Other questions raised by critical theory concern relationships between time, space and capital/class formations and ideology, along with heightened concerns over how ideology figures in the reproductions of power relations and how science and technology contribute to emancipation or domination.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
HIS 105
Also Known As: AFS 105

(Also AFS 105) This course will offer a broad survey of African peoples and the African Diaspora in the world, beginning with their African origins. Special attendtion will be paid to the elslavement of Africans, colonization and the resultant freedom struggles undertaken by Africans and the African Diaspora.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
AFS 105
Also Known As: HIS 105

This course will offer a broad survey of African peoples and the African Diaspora in the world, beginning with their African origins. Special attention will be paid to the enslavement of Africans, colonization, and the resultant freedom struggles undertaken by Africans and the African Diaspora.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
HIS 106

This course will introduce students to the myriad forms of geography: physical, cultural, social, religious, and economic, around the globe at various points in time. Of particular concern will be the various movements leading to modern globalization.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
APG 111
Also Known As: LAC 111

(Also LAC 111) An analysis of the theory and universality of culture from the historical, functional and structural approaches. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons as a basis for understanding contemporary society.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
LAC 111
Also Known As: APG 111

(Also APG 111) An analysis of the theory and universality of culture from the historical, functional and structural approaches. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons as a basis for understanding contemporary society.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
CAT 113
Also Known As: AFS 113

(Also AFS 113) Hand, heart and spirit have been an intrinsic part of the process of creativity, survival and enthusiasm in the African-American community. This studio course will draw inspiration from the rich artistic traditions in the African-American visual arts. We will engage in creative processes such as improvisation, quilting, and collage –concepts and techniques used by Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, and Romare Bearden. We will study narrative in the works of Ringgold, Jacob Lawrence and others. With this foundation, students will create their own personal narratives.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
AFS 113
Also Known As: CAT 113

(Also CAT 113) Hand, heart and spirit have been an intrinsic part of the process of creativity, survival and enthusiasm in the African-American community. This studio course will draw inspiration from the rich artistic traditions in the African-American visual arts. We will engage in creative processes such as improvisation, quilting, and collage –concepts and techniques used by Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, and Romare Bearden. We will study narrative in the works of Ringgold, Jacob Lawrence and others. With this foundation,students will create their own personal narratives.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
REL 115

This course introduces students to the academic study of religion. Various theories and methodologies are studied to understand the role of religion in society. This class focuses on theology, philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, liberationist theory, feminist/womanist theological ethics, and queer theory as a way to study religion critically.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Transcultural & Global Awareness
LAC 116

(Also HIS 116) This course will offer a broad overview of historical and contemporary issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Special attention will be paid to the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean peoples; national, ethnic, and racial identities; waves of migration within the region and beyond; and US-Latin American and Caribbean relations. The course will draw on interdisciplinary materials, including scholarly articles, and fiction.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
HIS 116

(Also LAC 116) This course will offer a broad overview of historical and contemporary issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Special attention will be paid to the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean peoples; national, ethnic, and racial identities; waves of migration within the region and beyond; and US-Latin American and Caribbean relations. The course will draw on interdisciplinary materials, including scholarly articles, and fiction.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
ENG 125

An introduction to the various literary genres: poetry, drama and fiction. Specific syllabus at the discretion of the instructor, but texts will come from the continents of Africa, Asia, Central and South America and from the Pacific Islands.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing
Minimum grade of C- or better required
Education Co-Concentration, Transcultural & Global Awareness
REL 201

A study of the Old Testament against the background of the ancient Near East emphasizing the history and religion of the Hebrew people.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing
With a minimum grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
GIS 202

The course is a continuance of the issues presented in International Studies I but can be taken without previously taking that course. In this course we contend with how critical theorists look anew at how social power reproduces itself. This course examines historically how different ideas regarding development, modernity, modernization and progress evolved in Europe and in the United States and how these ideas guided economic and social policies around the world. Additional topics covered include postmodernism, post-Fordism, post-colonialism, and post-structuralism. One of a the major theoretical shifts of this century has been the calling into question of the authoritativeness of knowledge. This course will delve into a critical analysis of such key concepts as the ‘world-system’, ‘hegemony’, and ‘empire’. The purpose of the course is gaining literacy, devising critiques and deriving inspiration in some areas of overlap among political economy, geopolitics and studies of representations of inferiorized otherness .

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
GIS 203
Also Known As: LAC 203

(Also LAC 203) General problems of comparative analysis. Political communication, political culture, modernization and nation-building, conflict and revolution.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
LAC 203
Also Known As: GIS 203

(Also GIS 203) General problems of comparative analysis. Political communication, political culture, modernization and nation-building, conflict and revolution.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
CAT 203

Great works of art give clues to the meanings and values of a culture. We will explore and compare the obvious and the hidden meanings of the art and architecture of the world’s great cultures, from prehistoric time to the Gothic (12th century) period of European art. Special attention to the ancient cultures of Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, China, Africa, Mexico, and Peru.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Transcultural & Global Awareness
CAT 204

A survey course designed to stimulate the interest in and understanding of the music of representative world cultures including: Native American, Sub-Sahara Africa, India and China. The focus will be on the comparison and contrast of both classic fold forms and more the contemporary forms as they continue to evolve and function in their individual cultures. The student is responsible for outside listening, research projects and field trips.  

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Transcultural & Global Awareness
REL 204

The writings of the New Testament will be studied in terms of their historical context, literary style, purpose, authorship, and religious teachings. A variety of approaches to the reading and understanding of this literature will be considered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
HIS 207
Also Known As: AFS 207

(Also AFS 207) This course begins with the history of Africans in continental Africa and their forced removal and enslavement in North America and continues through the Abolition movement, Emancipation, and Reconstruction. This course will examine the creolization of Africans in what became the United States, and the resultant religious, cultural, and political traditions. This is the first course in the African American History sequence.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
AFS 207
Also Known As: HIS 207

(Also HIS 207) (Writing Intensive) This course begins with the history of Africans in continental Africa and their forced removal and enslavement in North America and continues through the Abolition movement, Emancipation, and Reconstruction. This course will examine the creolization of Africans in what became the United States, and the resultant religious, cultural, and political traditions. This is the first course in the African-American History sequence.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
With a final grade of C or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
REL 208

The history of religion in the United States from the colonial period to the present day. Topics will include: the religious situation in Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries; immigration patterns of the colonists; frontier expansion and the industrial revolution; the growth of denominationalism; religion and science; liberal and conservative ends; civil religion; "cults'' and other contemporary issues.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Transcultural & Global Awareness
GIS 208

This course aims to introduce you to several of the more prominent IR theories that now pervade the discipline: Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Critical Theory, Normative Theory, Feminism, Historical Sociology, Post-Modernism, Social Constructivism, Green Political Theory, and Evolutionary Biology. In this sense, IR theory is the language that you need to learn in order to make sense of much, if not all, of the wide range of discourse and debate that transpire in IR circles. The course operates primarily in the ‘system’ level and gives special attention to political realism (Realpolitik)–the oldest and, arguably, the most popular theoretical perspective in the field–and recent ‘constructivist’ work. In the broadest terms, the course explores the place(s) of power, institutions, and values in international relations.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
GIS 210

This course provides a theoretical and historical introduction to human rights, on the premise that a sound understanding of contemporary practice and debates requires grounding in their historical and theoretical roots and foundations. We will focus especially on the practical and political implications of human rights in an attempt to understand how and why they matter for what actually happens in world politics as opposed to what one might wish would happen. We will ask questions such as: What obligations do states have to defend and guarantee human rights at home? How are those obligations enforced, if at all? To what degree do such obligations extend internationally? Who decides when international intervention is justified and what are the pitfalls associated with humanitarian action? Is religion compatible to secular views of universal rights? Did the industrial revolution and socialist tradition contribute to human rights? And, are there tensions between security and universal rights?.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
REL 211

This course seeks to develop in the student an awareness of sociological approaches to the study and understanding of religion. It will consider the various ways of defining and articulating the sociological dimensions of religion. Included will be an exploration of how American and other societies have been influenced by religious factors as well as an investigation of how society itself can shape religion. The relationship of religion to politics, economics, class structures, sexual roles and other vital areas of human life will be examined.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness

General Education: Writing Courses

WRT 102

This course is designed for students in need of extended instruction in college-level writing. It teaches writing as a process by requiring a number of written drafts per essay. The focus is on developing students’ college-level competence in analytic and argumentative, thesis-based writing. This class meets four times a week; twice in a traditional college setting, and twice in a computer lab/studio setting. Much of your written work will be done in the studio.

2.00 c.u.
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C- or better. Students who successfully pass this class take WRT 108 the next semester.
WRT 105

This course is designed for students in need of enhanced instruction in college-level writing. It teaches writing as a process by requiring a number of written drafts per essay. The focus is on developing students’ college-level competence in argumentative, thesis-based writing. Many classes are held in the computer lab to enable intensive writing instruction, and some out-of-class tutoring may be assigned.

1.50 c.u.
Students must receive a grade of C- or better to advance to WRT 109.
WRT 106

This course teaches writing as a process by requiring a number of written drafts per essay and short in-class written assignments, all of which are based on critical reading source materials. The focus is developing students’ college-level competence in analytic and argumentative, thesis-based writing. Some classes are held in the writing/computer labs, and some out-of-class tutoring may be assigned.

1.00 c.u.
Students must receive a grade of C- or better to advance to WRT 109.
WRT 108

This course continues to develop students’ competency in thesis-based writing with an emphasis on information literacy and the writing process. It is designed for students in need of enhanced instruction in the college-level research. The course teaches students to synthesize source material into a variety of genres. Some classes are held in the writing/computer labs, and some out-of-class tutoring may be assigned.

1.50 c.u.
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C- or better; Nursing and Education students must receive a C or better.
WRT 109

Formerly WRT 107. This course continues to develop students’ competency in thesis-based writing with an emphasis on information literacy and the writing process. The course introduces students to the college-level research process and teaches them to synthesize source material into a variety of written genres. Some classes are held in the writing/computer labs, and some out-ofclass tutoring my be assigned. Required of all students.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C- or better and passing the WRT 109 Exit Exam. Prerequisite: WRT 105A or WRT 106A with a grade of C- or better.

General Education: Writing Intensive Courses

ENG 202

Selected works of English and American literature, in all three major genres, focusing on a particular issue or topic of contemporary interest, such as sports, women in literature, science fiction, popular culture, existentialism, religion. Emphasis on how the various writers present these problems in styles peculiar to their genres. Students may repeat this course once for credit with consent of discipline coordinator.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Writing Intensive
ENG 203

Selected works in English literature with emphasis on historical, cultural, and aesthetic values, including material from Beowulf to Boswell. Lecture and discussion

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Education Co-Concentration, Writing Intensive
ENG 204

Selected works in English literature with emphasis on historical, cultural, and aesthetic values, including material from the romantic period to the Second World War. Lecture, discussion.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Education Co-Concentration, Writing Intensive
PSY 205

An introduction to the study of human development across the lifespan. The course focuses on research methodology and current literature in the areas of physical, cognitive, social, and personality changes from conception to death. Stress is placed on evaluating the relative contributions of nature and nurture to these changes.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Writing Intensive
CAT 206
Also Known As: CRW 206

(Also ENG 206) The focus is on writing a feature-length film and the basic elements of plot, protagonist, turning point, and resolution. You will be expected to complete a step outline of your story and the first act of your screenplay.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Writing Intensive
CRW 206
Also Known As: CAT 206

(Also CAT 206) The focus is on writing a feature-length film and the basic elements of plot, protagonist, turning point, and resolution. You will be expected to complete a step outline of your story and the first act of your screenplay.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Writing Intensive
HIS 207
Also Known As: AFS 207

(Also AFS 207) This course begins with the history of Africans in continental Africa and their forced removal and enslavement in North America and continues through the Abolition movement, Emancipation, and Reconstruction. This course will examine the creolization of Africans in what became the United States, and the resultant religious, cultural, and political traditions. This is the first course in the African American History sequence.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
AFS 207
Also Known As: HIS 207

(Also HIS 207) (Writing Intensive) This course begins with the history of Africans in continental Africa and their forced removal and enslavement in North America and continues through the Abolition movement, Emancipation, and Reconstruction. This course will examine the creolization of Africans in what became the United States, and the resultant religious, cultural, and political traditions. This is the first course in the African-American History sequence.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
With a final grade of C or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
HIS 216
Also Known As: LAC 216

(Also LAC 216) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean from Conquest to Independence. Special attention will be paid to encounters between various peoples; the economic, political, and cultural institutions of the colonial period; and the wars for independence that ended colonialism. This is the first course offered in the Latin American-Caribbean survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
CAT 216
Also Known As: AFS 216

(Also AFS 216) Emma Amos, Betty Saar, Sam Gilliam, Jacob Lawrence. Do you recognize the names of these artists? Study the achievements of artists of color. How have they integrated their cultural identity with their self-expression? Where and when have African, European, Latino and Caribbean influences affected their art? How have African-American artists established strong, creative communities? Visits to museums, galleries, and cultural centers in New Jersey and New York.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
AFS 216
Also Known As: CAT 216

 (Also CAT 216) Emma Amos, Betty Saar, Sam Gilliam, Jacob Lawrence. Do you recognize the names of these artists? Study the achievements of artists of color. How have they integrated their cultural identity with their self-expression? Where and when have African, European, Latino and Caribbean influences affected their art? How have African-American artists established strong, creative communities? Visits to museums, galleries, and cultural centers in New Jersey and New York.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
LAC 216
Also Known As: HIS 216

(Also HIS 216) This course explores the history of Latin America and the Caribbean from Conquest to Independence. Special attention will be paid to encounters between various peoples; the economic, political, and cultural institutions of the colonial period; and the wars for independence that ended colonialism. This is the first course offered in the Latin American-Caribbean survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
HIS 219

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of writing history. Students will learn to both identify and make historical arguments, use primary and secondary sources to appropriately support an argument and successfully sustain an argument throughout academic papers of varying lengths. Students will develop their writing by editing and revising multiple drafts of papers.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
WMS 223

(Also ENG 223) This course focuses on literature in English written by women. We study themes and techniques common to the literature by women. From the late Middle Ages until the present, we examine texts that challenge beliefs of female inferiority, promote a women's perspective on gender and allow for discussion of self esteem, motherhood, privacy, and women's power.                     

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 223
Also Known As: WMS 223

(Also WMS 223) This course focuses on literature in English written by women. We study themes and techniques common to the literature by women. From the late Middle Ages until the present, we examine texts that challenge beliefs about female inferiority, promote a women’s perspective on gender and allow for a discussion of self-esteem, motherhood, privacy and women’s power.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
COM 224

(Formerly JOU 224) This course focuses on the basics of journalism reporting and writing. It will introduce students to the fundamentals as well as modern techniques in news gathering and writing. Students will report and write stories as an entry level journalist. Sessions will involve class writing as well as discussions and analysis of news coverage.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Minimum grade C- or higher
Writing Intensive
HIS 225
Also Known As: AFS 225

(Also AFS 225) This course explores the African American struggle for freedom after Reconstruction. Of articular concern will be the economic, political, social and cultural struggles that African- Americans waged to secure freedom and justice in the face of racial segregation and injustice. This is the second course in the African- American survey.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
AFS 225
Also Known As: HIS 225

(Also HIS 225) This course explores the African American struggle for freedom after Reconstruction. Of particular concern will be the economic, political, social and cultural struggles that African-Americans waged to secure freedom and justice in the face of racial segregation and injustice. This is the second course in the African-American survey

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking, Writing Intensive
AFS 226
Also Known As: WMS 226 , ENG 226

Varied works of western and/or non-western literature that illustrates how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
WMS 226
Also Known As: ENG 226 , AFS 226

(Also AFS/ENG 226) Varied works of literature that illustrate how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves and each will be studied.  Included are works of Philip Roth, Mary Gordon, Ishmael Reed and Alice Walker.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
ENG 226
Also Known As: AFS 226 , WMS 226

(Also AFS/WMS 226) Varied works of western and/or non-western literature that illustrates how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
REL 227

Selected poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction that explore such topics as faith, the nature and presence of God, death and immortality, spirituality, sin, and salvation. The course invites student to examine and reflect on the interrelationship of literary expression and a theological understanding of the world.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C- or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
ENG 227
Also Known As: REL 227

(Also REL 227) Selected poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction that explore such topics as faith, the nature and presence of God, death and immortality, spirituality, sin, and salvation. The course invites students to examine and reflect on the interrelationship of literary expression and a theological understanding of the world.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
CAT 230

This class will explore the history and development of animation throughout the 20th century. Major social and technological movements and the effects they had on animators working at the time will be analyzed and discussed. This work will be examined to see how animation has developed as an art form. The class will read related texts and view historic and contemporary animation work.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
COM 234

(Formerly JOU 234) The course builds on journalism basics and applies these to writing for digital media and producting multimedia journalism. Students will learn how to report, write, and produce for digital publications, and how to effectively utilize 21st century journalism applications and technology including blogging, social media, and multimedia.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Writing Intensive

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