Summer Sessions

Summer Sessions

Financial Eligibility Information

Are you ready to catch up and get ahead this summer?

You can do so ... and get two classes for the price of one!

At Bloomfield College, students have four different Summer Sessions to choose from.

Whether you are looking for an intensive three-week course, a traditional seven-week summer course, or an extended14-week course, we've got you covered.

Open to current Bloomfield College students and alumni, students from other institutions, rising high school seniors, and members of the community, our summer sessions provide high-level academic courses at a discounted tuition.

Student's enrolled in summer courses can utilize payment plans.

Current students can can apply for the Payment Plan with the Office of Student Financial Services or apply online for either a Federal Parent PLUS loan or Student Alternative Loan. To be eligible to borrow Parent PLUS Loans, the student must be enrolled at least half-time over the 14-week period.

Are you Pell Eligible? Current Bloomfield College students can use their Pell for summer courses.

Complete course details are available at our online course catalog. Contact the Office of Advising/Coaching at 973-748-9000 ext. 1759 or advising@bloomfield.edu if you have any questions.

You can also get a look at the courses available for each session below. Just click on the down arrow to see the options.

Visiting and Adult Students

Are you back in the Bloomfield area this summer? Why not keep your academic momentum going and take classes at Bloomfield College!

We will work with you to make sure you can receive college credit at your home institution.

Before you can register, please fill out our non-degree application. Once you have been accepted as a non-matriculating student, you will be able to register for summer courses.

Rising Seniors (juniors who will be seniors in the fall): You can take classes too. Two courses at the price of one does not apply for rising seniors, as courses are already offered at a discount. Find out how here.

Summer Sessions and Course Offerings

May Term (4 weeks - I5) May 16 – June 8

BUS 333

A study of a major business issue, person or activity occurring in the contemporary business world. Possible topics: government deregulation; environment; social responsibilities; mergers; conglomerates; world trade; etc. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisite will be announced with topic.
CRW 120

Introduction to the craft of writing. Frequent in-class and home assignments to explore various writing techniques and hone developing skills. This course culminates in a final portfolio of completed fiction, poetry and short drama. Designed primarily for freshmen

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
GIS 100

The nature and use of political power. Political analysis of social institutions and behavior and their impact upon the distribution of social values. Current political problems.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
SOC 325

This course provides an introduction to research methods used by sociologists. It reviews the guidelines, principles, and techniques for collecting social science data, including measurement, sampling, survey instrumentation, and field research.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: SOC 215 Statistics For Sociologists
With a grade of C or better.
SOC 433

Advanced selected topics in Sociology. Depending upon the instructor, course topics may be suited for either General Sociology or Criminal Justice Concentration students. As topics change, this course may be repeated for credit.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: SOC 325 Methods Of Social Research
Writing Intensive

Summer Session I (7 weeks - S5) May 16- July 5

ACC 201

Basic accounting concepts, fundamentals of accounting procedures, development of accounting principles and practices, and the determination,valuation, and presentation of accounting information. Emphasis on accounting theory and its relationship to the preparation of financial accounting statements. Use of a computerized practice set will be required.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: BUS 200 Introduction To Management , CMP 108 Spreadsheet Essentials , MTH 140 College Algebra: Enhanced , MTH 141 College Algebra
Take either MTH 140 or MTH 141
ACC 505

The course will include a study of corporate tax, taxation for partnerships and advanced topics in accounting for individuals. The course will use a case study format to apply these topics to real life situations.

1.00 c.u.
ACC 630

The course covers current techniques of research and preparation of a research project. Student will select a topic for research that will require a formal paper and a presentation. This is the capstone project.

1.00 c.u.
Completion of seven graduate courses.
BIO 115

This course presents selected topics in biology. Topics may include evolution, biomechanics (e.g. flight), emerg ing diseases (e.g. AIDS, Ebola virus), history of biological science, antibiotic resistant pathogens, cancer, nutrition, biotechnology and human affairs, etc. As topics change, this course may be repeated for credit.    Science majors may not enroll in this course without the consent of the Instructor.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Scientific Literacy
BIO 450

The seminar is designed to bring upperclassmen in all biology concentrations together so that they can discuss the major principles of this discipline. The preparation of a literature research paper and its oral presentation develop the ability to critically assess the research literature, expose students to subject areas not encountered in previous courses, develop communication skills, and serve as a basis for continued learning in individual students’ particular areas of interest.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Biology major–Junior/Senior level standing and five(5) Biology courses.
Education Co-Concentration, Writing Intensive
BUS 107

This course helps individuals understand personal financial planning. Specifically, the content of this course is geared to teach students how to prepare personal budgets and how to evaluate insurance requirements. The fundamentals of investment decisions will also be covered. Any student who has taken or is taking BUS 312 cannot take BUS 107 for credit.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
BUS 200

Introduction to the world of a manager, the knowledge needed, the process of managing, the actual practice of managing, and the adjustments to change that are important in the modern world.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
BUS 332

A course intended for junior-level students. Will examine: foreign currency, accounting principles, foreign exchange, (SPOT, Forward Rates) the International monetary system, foreign exchange risk management, work in capital management in international operations, sources of funds for working capital and longterm investments in international markets. Corequisite: BUS 312.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Corequisites: BUS 312 Managerial Finance
Writing Intensive
CAT 218

Studio work in composition and color in acrylic or oils.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 257

An introduction to video as a creative visual, auditory, and spatial medium. Students learn the fundamentals of video production with the goal of making original work in a the genres of single-channel, performance, and installation. Works by filmmakers and video artists are viewed and discussed. It is highly recommended that students take CAT 126 Digital Photography prior to enrolling in this class.

1.00 c.u.
Aesthetic Appreciation
CAT 259

This course examines the evolution of mechanically reproduced media and its inevitable application by the aesthetic community, beginning with the invention of the film camera (1800s) to digital technology (1940s), through to contemporary field of interactivity, sound and image. This course discusses the convergence of the scientific, military, and political environments that spawned the employment of technology

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
CMP 126

An introduction to the problem solving process, numerical methods, algorithms and algorithm design . Basic principles of software engineering, program design, coding, debugging, and documentation are introduced . Structured and object-oriented programming is taught using the Java platform.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
COM 122

(Formerly JOU 122) This course focuses on the theory and skills of preparing and presenting public speeches. The emphasis in this course is on practice and evaluation of classroom presentations and professional speeches.

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
ENG 281

This course examines the relationship between literature, film and theory. More specifically, it examines how literature and film can encapsulate crucial aspects of a theoretical text, enriching and expanding our experience and understanding of it.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Aesthetic Appreciation, Writing Intensive
FYS 100

The goal of the First-Year Seminar is to welcome the student to Bloomfield College by providing support in transition to college life; understanding the value of a liberal arts education; furthering the development of student career, college and life success skills; and building the expectation of academic and life success.

1.00 c.u.
MTH 130

A course designed to develop a transition from high school expectations to the study of mathematics at the collegiate level made easier through the use of the TI-84+ graping calculator as an aid to understanding of mathematical concepts. Critical thinking will be a central theme woven through the concepts of number sense; using percents to show change and comparison; solving simple equations through the application of interest, discount, and sales price; and introductory algebra including applications of linear and quadratic functions. This course will be waived if the student’s mathematical preparation is sufficient. Students who have received credit for a higher level mathematics may not take this course.

1.00 c.u.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 141

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 161

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of T1-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition, MTH 161 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 200

This course covers the methodology of organizing, summarizing, and presenting statistical data. Students calculate and interpret the measures of central tendency and dispersion and are introduced to probability and distribution theory (Normal, Binomial, Poisson). They use distribution and sampling theory to make statistical inferences.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 140 College Algebra: Enhanced , MTH 141 College Algebra , MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
MTH 221

Basic theory of differential calculus through the concepts of limits and continuity are the goals of this course. Necessary analytic geometry is developed as required. Algebraic and trigonometric functions, curve sketching and applications to real world problems (including maximum/minimum problems). The Mean Value Theorem, and its consequences are covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
With a grade of C or higher
Education Co-Concentration
MTH 332

Topics in this course include: elementary set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete functions, relations and graphs, trees, counting procedures and Boolean Algebra. Application of these topics in computer science will be covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
With a grade of C or better.
NUR 268

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of pathophysiology and pharmacology. Students will study the science of pharmacology to develop an understanding of medications and their interactions in human disease and the mechanisms that govern them. Students will examine the pathophysiological and pharmacological phenomena that produce alterations in human physiology and the resulting human response to pharmaco-therapeutic intervention.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: BIO 200 Microbiology , CHM 120 Fundamentals Of Inorganic, Organic And Biochemistry , NUR 241 Adult Health I
Corequisites: BIO 200 Microbiology , CHM 120 Fundamentals Of Inorganic, Organic And Biochemistry , NUR 241 Adult Health I
NUR 358

Students study the science of pharmacology to develop an understanding of drugs and their interactions in humans. Drug classifications provide the framework for nursing interventions and client education. Dimensional analysis is used to solve a variety of medication calculation problems. Prerequisites: CHM 120; NUR 215, NUR 235. Corequisites: BIO 200; NUR 241.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: NUR 358 Pharmacology , NUR 215 Foundations Of Professional Practice , NUR 235 Health And Physical Assessment
Corequisites: BIO 200 Microbiology , NUR 241 Adult Health I
PSY 100

Introduction to psychological research methods, biological foundations, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, human development, personality, social behavior, psychological disorders and treatment, and applied psychology.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
PSY 201

An examination of various topics including classical conditioning, operant conditioning, memory, language, thinking, creativity and problem-solving.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology

Summer Session II (7 weeks - S7) July 7 - August 25

ACC 204

To continue the study of basic accounting concepts, fundamentals of accounting procedures, development of accounting principles and practices, and the determination, valuation, and presentation of accounting information. Emphasis on the use of accounting information as it pertains to management.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I
AFS 226
Also Known As: WMS 226 , ENG 226

Varied works of western and/or non-western literature that illustrates how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
BUS 107

This course helps individuals understand personal financial planning. Specifically, the content of this course is geared to teach students how to prepare personal budgets and how to evaluate insurance requirements. The fundamentals of investment decisions will also be covered. Any student who has taken or is taking BUS 312 cannot take BUS 107 for credit.

1.00 c.u.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
BUS 333

A study of a major business issue, person or activity occurring in the contemporary business world. Possible topics: government deregulation; environment; social responsibilities; mergers; conglomerates; world trade; etc. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisite will be announced with topic.
BUS 362

This course will explore varied ethical issues from the business world in conjunction with models of leadership leading to how those ethical issues are resolved. The intent is to deepen and broaden student’s learning about theories, models, and constructs related to the study and practice of ethics and leadership. This includes experiential learning activities and discussions that connect formal knowledge with real world experiences and includes one credit of experiential learning.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: BUS 200 Introduction To Management
CAT 108

This course covers the broader aspects of the games industry such as its history, its current state and potential future evolution, and the team-based development environment. It then focuses on core game design concepts and their application as students create documentation and work in collaborative groups to develop analog games.

1.00 c.u.
CRW 120

Introduction to the craft of writing. Frequent in-class and home assignments to explore various writing techniques and hone developing skills. This course culminates in a final portfolio of completed fiction, poetry and short drama. Designed primarily for freshmen

1.00 c.u.
Corequisites: WRT 102 Enhanced Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 105 Argumentative and Analytic Writing , WRT 106 Accelerated Argumentative and Analytic Writing
Communication Skills, Education Co-Concentration
ENG 226
Also Known As: AFS 226 , WMS 226

(Also AFS/WMS 226) Varied works of western and/or non-western literature that illustrates how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive
HIS 116

(Also LAC 116) This course will offer a broad overview of historical and contemporary issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Special attention will be paid to the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean peoples; national, ethnic, and racial identities; waves of migration within the region and beyond; and US-Latin American and Caribbean relations. The course will draw on interdisciplinary materials, including scholarly articles, and fiction.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
LAC 116

(Also HIS 116) This course will offer a broad overview of historical and contemporary issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Special attention will be paid to the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean peoples; national, ethnic, and racial identities; waves of migration within the region and beyond; and US-Latin American and Caribbean relations. The course will draw on interdisciplinary materials, including scholarly articles, and fiction.

1.00 c.u.
Transcultural & Global Awareness
MTH 130

A course designed to develop a transition from high school expectations to the study of mathematics at the collegiate level made easier through the use of the TI-84+ graping calculator as an aid to understanding of mathematical concepts. Critical thinking will be a central theme woven through the concepts of number sense; using percents to show change and comparison; solving simple equations through the application of interest, discount, and sales price; and introductory algebra including applications of linear and quadratic functions. This course will be waived if the student’s mathematical preparation is sufficient. Students who have received credit for a higher level mathematics may not take this course.

1.00 c.u.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 141

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 161

The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of T1-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition, MTH 161 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
An appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or an SAT Mathematics score of 550 or higher.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 200

This course covers the methodology of organizing, summarizing, and presenting statistical data. Students calculate and interpret the measures of central tendency and dispersion and are introduced to probability and distribution theory (Normal, Binomial, Poisson). They use distribution and sampling theory to make statistical inferences.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 140 College Algebra: Enhanced , MTH 141 College Algebra , MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
MTH 221

Basic theory of differential calculus through the concepts of limits and continuity are the goals of this course. Necessary analytic geometry is developed as required. Algebraic and trigonometric functions, curve sketching and applications to real world problems (including maximum/minimum problems). The Mean Value Theorem, and its consequences are covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
With a grade of C or higher
Education Co-Concentration
MTH 332

Topics in this course include: elementary set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete functions, relations and graphs, trees, counting procedures and Boolean Algebra. Application of these topics in computer science will be covered.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 160 Precalculus: Enhanced , MTH 161 Precalculus
With a grade of C or better.
PSY 205

An introduction to the study of human development across the lifespan. The course focuses on research methodology and current literature in the areas of physical, cognitive, social, and personality changes from conception to death. Stress is placed on evaluating the relative contributions of nature and nurture to these changes.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Writing Intensive
PSY 311

This combined lecture and laboratory course primarily focuses on qualitative and applied research methods used in educational, social services and corporate settings. Methods covered will include focus groups, structured interviews, archival research and program evaluation.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 310 Research Methods I , SOC 325 Methods Of Social Research , WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
Writing Intensive
PSY 333

Topics may include relationships and divorce, history and systems, self in contemporary psychology among others. Course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

Please contact your instructor for specific topic

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology
And an additional prerequisite to be announced when course is offered.
SOC 235

This course studies cities as physical settings which shape and are shaped by social life, and also the social experiences that such settings produce. The course focuses on cities in history, theories of urbanization, the impact of race, ethnicity, class, and gender on cities, and worldwide urbanization.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 Introduction To Psychology , SOC 100 Introduction To Sociology
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
WMS 226
Also Known As: ENG 226 , AFS 226

(Also AFS/ENG 226) Varied works of literature that illustrate how different races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes view themselves and each will be studied.  Included are works of Philip Roth, Mary Gordon, Ishmael Reed and Alice Walker.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: WRT 108 Enhanced Synthesis and Research Writing , WRT 109 Synthesis and Research Writing
With a final grade of C-or better.
Transcultural & Global Awareness, Writing Intensive

Summer Trimester (14 weeks - SU) May 16 - August 24

CAT 126

Study the history of photography and explore the aesthetic opportunities of digital cameras. Practice storytelling through the development of single and sequential images. Learn about the operational functions of a digital single lens reflex (SLR) camera, digital editing, digital retouching, color management and output, and lighting for studio shots.

1.00 c.u.
CAT 380

A semester-long internship required of CAT majors in their junior year: Placement will be in professional settings appropriate to the student's area of specialization and where the student will have ample opportunity to actually use their new skills: theatres, art galleries, music production companies, television, video, and radio studios, design firms, service bureaus, publishing houses, community service organizations, small businesses, and corporations. Field placement is required.  

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor required
CAT 430

This course has the same goals and requirements as Internship I, but the intention is to place the student in a situation at a higher technical level and with even more professional responsibiluity.

1.00 c.u.
Consent of the Instructor required.
MTH 140

This is an enriched college algebra course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ graphing calculator. Polynomial, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions are considered. The course also includes an introduction to matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and the study of descriptive statistics in order to interpret data and make informed decisions. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 140 and MTH 141.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math
MTH 160

This is an enriched pre-calculus course supported by structured activities to promote student success. The concept of functions and their properties form a central theme. Multiple representations of function properties are made possible through the use of the TI-84+ calculator. Polynormal, quadrantic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions are considered. In addition MTH 160 includes an overview of matrices as a method of solving systems of equations and an introduction to limits and tangent lines. Students may not receive credit for both MTH 160 and MTH 161.

1.00 c.u.
Prerequisites: MTH 130 Transition to Collegiate Mathematics
Or an appropriate score in the mathematics placement test.
Gen Ed Math

© Bloomfield College 467 Franklin St. Bloomfield, NJ 07003 973-748-9000